Case Study:The Green Revolution

Case Study:The Green Revolution

ORDER NOW FOR AN ORIGINAL PAPER ASSIGNMENT: Case Study:The Green Revolution  

Case Study:The Green Revolution

Case Study: Asia

Unhealthy soils in the cradle of the Green Revolution Irrigated rice and wheat are grown on 23.5 million acres of land inhabited by more than 1 billion people in the Indo-Gangetic plains and other fertile valleys of Asia. Yields in this system, which rose dramatically during the Green Revolution, have now reached a plateau, largely because of declining soil health. Farmers apply too much nitrogen fertilizer and too little organic matter and other sources of essential nutrients, resulting in severe deficiencies of phosphorus and potassium and widespread micronutrient deficiencies. Too low a proportion of crop residues is incorporated back into the soil; animal dung is burned as domestic fuel; excessive tillage is practiced to control weeds; few or no green manures, cover crops, or agroforestry technologies are used; and rising water tables are leading to salinization.

Case Study:The Green Revolution

Case Study:The Green Revolution

The degradation of soil and water resources severely affects human health. Many parts of South Asia that depend on the rice-wheat system are now hunger hotspots. In addition to calorie and protein undernutrition, iron and zinc deficiencies are pervasive, particularly among nursing mothers and infants. Agricultural productivity and human health in the region will only be improved and sustained if soil and water resources are restored and maintained. This can be done through the use of technologies such as conservation tillage and planting on raised beds, which are gradually spreading through parts of the region. Conservation tillage is now used on about 1.3 million hectares of irrigated wheat land, where the crop residues left as mulch have begun to rebuild soil organic matter. The degradation of soil and water resources severely affects human health. Many parts of South Asia that depend on the rice-wheat system are now hunger hotspots. In addition to calorie and protein undernutrition, iron and zinc deficiencies are pervasive, particularly among nursing mothers and infants. Agricultural productivity and human health in the region will only be improved and sustained if soil and water resources are restored and maintained. This can be done through the use of technologies such as conservation tillage and planting on raised beds, which are gradually spreading through parts of the region. Conservation tillage is now used on about 1.3 million hectares of irrigated wheat land, where the crop residues left as mulch have begun to rebuild soil organic matter. The degradation of soil and water resources severely affects human health. Many parts of South Asia that depend on the rice-wheat system are now hunger hotspots. In addition to calorie and protein undernutrition, iron and zinc deficiencies are pervasive, particularly among nursing mothers and infants. Agricultural productivity and human health in the region will only be improved and sustained if soil and water resources are restored and maintained. This can be done through the use of technologies such as conservation tillage and planting on raised beds, which are gradually spreading through parts of the region. Conservation tillage is now used on about 1.3 million hectares of irrigated wheat land, where the crop residues left as mulch have begun to rebuild soil organic matter.rice–wheat system are now hunger hotspots. In addition to calorie and protein undernutrition, iron and zinc deficiencies are pervasive, particularly among nursing mothers and infants. Agricultural productivity and human health in the region will only be improved and sustained if soil and water resources are restored and maintained. This can be done through the use of technologies such as conservation tillage and planting on raised beds, which are gradually spreading through parts of the region. Conservation tillage is now used on about 1.3 million hectares of irrigated wheat land, where the crop residues left as mulch have begun to rebuild soil organic matter.

Source: UN Millennium Project Hunger Task Force (2005) Halving Hunger: It Can Be Done

Question:

Using this case study, discuss what you think are the main causes and best strategies to overcome malnutrition in the world.

You must proofread your paper. But do not strictly rely on your computer’s spell-checker and grammar-checker; failure to do so indicates a lack of effort on your part and you can expect your grade to suffer accordingly. Papers with numerous misspelled words and grammatical mistakes will be penalized. Read over your paper – in silence and then aloud – before handing it in and make corrections as necessary. Often it is advantageous to have a friend proofread your paper for obvious errors. Handwritten corrections are preferable to uncorrected mistakes.

Use a standard 10 to 12 point (10 to 12 characters per inch) typeface. Smaller or compressed type and papers with small margins or single-spacing are hard to read. It is better to let your essay run over the recommended number of pages than to try to compress it into fewer pages.

Likewise, large type, large margins, large indentations, triple-spacing, increased leading (space between lines), increased kerning (space between letters), and any other such attempts at “padding” to increase the length of a paper are unacceptable, wasteful of trees, and will not fool your professor.

The paper must be neatly formatted, double-spaced with a one-inch margin on the top, bottom, and sides of each page. When submitting hard copy, be sure to use white paper and print out using dark ink. If it is hard to read your essay, it will also be hard to follow your argument.

 

 

Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 50
Use the following coupon code :
NPS15
Order Now

The post Case Study:The Green Revolution appeared first on Savvy Essay Writers.